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8 Greatest Pride and Prejudice Infographics

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8 Greatest Pride and Prejudice Infographics I have a confession to make. Sadly, I am but a humble fan of Pride and Prejudice. I am not an author, professor, researcher, or archivist who dutifully spends countless hours immersed in everything Pride and Prejudice. No my faithful fanatics. I have a day job. *gasp* My day job involves countless hours of reviewing lots and lots of data, squinting at spreadsheets and then presenting information. It is not nearly as glamorous as I just made it sound either. But fortunately for me (and for you!) I'm really good at my job. The reason for this is because I enjoy data. I love taking large datasets apart and presenting something meaningful. It's like a little treasure hunt and it is very rewarding... to me at least. In the coming weeks, I will be using these unique skills and combining them with my passion for Pride and Prejudice to bring you the most in depth Pride and Prejudice Infographics you will ever see. Want to know

List of Characters in Pride and Prejudice

List of Characters in Pride and Prejudice Below is a list of the major characters included in the novel Pride and Prejudice.  See complete list of all characters including descriptions and analysis, on my Characters Resource Page . Elizabeth Bennet —protagonist, the second of five daughters; pragmatic and independent; her father’s favorite Miss Jane Bennet —Elizabeth’s older sister; wants to see the best in everyone; Mary Bennett —the plain, bookish middle sister Miss Catherine (Kitty) Bennett —easily led and shallow fourth daughter Lydia Bennet —the youngest sister, flirty and undisciplined Mr. Bennet —their father, cynical and permissive Mrs. Bennet —their mother, whose main goal is to find husbands for her daughters Charlotte Lucas —Elizabeth’s best friend Sir William and Mrs. Lucas —The Bennets’ neighbors Mr. Collins —the Bennet girls’ overbearing cousin, a priggish clergyman who stands to inherit Longbourn, the Bennets’ entailed estate The Gardiners —Mrs. B

Biography of Jane Austen

Biography of Jane Austen  Source:  PrideGuide Jane Austen was born December 16, 1775, to Rev. George Austen and the former Cassandra Leigh in Steventon, Hampshire. Like the families in many of her novels, the Austens were a large family of respectable lineage but no fortune. She was one of eight children. Her letters to her only sister Cassandra (the surviving letters date to 1796) are the primary source of biographical information. Although she never married, her letters to Cassandra and other writings reveal several romantic entanglements, including a very brief engagement (which lasted only one evening). She moved several times around the English countryside, but information about her work is somewhat sketchy. She began to write as a teenager, though kept her work hidden from all but her immediate family. Legend has it that while she was living with relatives after her father’s death in 1805, she asked that a squeaky hinge on the room’s swinging door not be oiled. This way, sh

Jane Austen’s England

Source:  PrideGuide Jane Austen’s England  The English Regency The English Regency, in its most literal interpretation, encompasses the years 1811 to 1820. It began when the Prince of Wales was appointed Regent of England after his father, King George III, fell insane. The Industrial Revolution, which had begun in the mid-18th century, continued to bring innovation to the Western hemisphere during this era, while the political world remained entangled in wars and revolutions. In the Regency’s broader interpretation—when used to describe periods of art, literature, fashion, design, and architecture—the Regency can encompass years as early as 1790 and as late as 1830. Britain was transformed by the Industrial Revolution in the late 18th century. Until then most people lived in the countryside and made their living from farming. By the mid 19th century most people in Britain lived in towns and made their living from mining or manufacturing industries. Rules for Society During t

How old is Elizabeth Bennet in Pride and Prejudice the novel by Jane Austen?

Elizabeth Bennet is 20 in the novel Pride and Prejudice. From the novel: Lady Catherine seemed quite astonished at not receiving a direct answer; and Elizabeth suspected herself to be the first creature who had ever dared to trifle with so much dignified impertinence. "You cannot be more than twenty, I am sure, therefore you need not conceal your age." "I am not one-and-twenty."

Why did Jane Austen name Pride and Prejudice Pride and Prejudice?

Originally titled First Impressions, Jane Austen changed the name of her ever enduring novel to Pride and Prejudice after a recommendation from her publisher. She had great success with her first published novel, Sense and Sensibility, and get publisher wanted her next novel to cash in on that popularity. By having the title follow the same naming convention, they believed her novel would be an instant success. I don't think any of them could have envisioned just how successful the novel would become.

What is Pride and Prejudice?

Pride and Prejudice is a famous novel by Jane Austen. The novel centers around the concept of love, marriage, and during the  regency era in England. Published in 1813, the novel remains at the top of the world's best novels lists. 200 years later, the tale of romance between Elizabeth and Darcy endures.

Does anyone die in Pride and Prejudice?

Thankfully no characters are killed off in Pride and Prejudice. There are characters who have passed on and are mentioned in the book, but nobody dies within the text. Some deceased characters mentioned: Sir Darcy (Senior) Lady Anne Darcy Bingley's father Mr. Collins (Senior) Mr. Wickham (Senior)

What is the point of view of Pride and Prejudice?

The novel Pride and Prejudice is told from the third person point of view. The point of view of a novel usually decides which characters we sympathize with. In the novel, Elizabeth Bennett is the focal character allowing the audience to feel as if the story is told about her experiences through an unbiased lense.

Mr. Bennet Passed Away

For each of us, there is only one. One special actor portraying one special character. For me, and thus for this website, that one is Mr. Benjamin Whitrow.  He was our Mr. Bennet.  He was our quintessential father figure in a story that is as timeless as his performance.  I can vividly recall my first viewing of Pride and Prejudice.  It was in my senior year of English Literature in 2002.  Our teacher put on the video for the 1995 adaptation from the BBC.  At that time, I had neither heard nor seen anything at all to do with Jane Austen nor Pride and Prejudice.  After the first installment, I was in love.  I would never dream to say that I fell in love with Jane Austen's works based solely on the performance of one actor, but if there is one actor that has stood out over the course of time from my initial viewing it would have to be Benjamin Whitrow. His animation of the text, his vivacity of character, his overall essential being... he is Mr. Bennet to me. I cannot imagine a

Do you pay attention to first impressions?

There's a reason why Jane Austen titled her first draft of Pride and Prejudice as First Impressions.  It is so very easy to misinterpret the intentions of others. First impressions are all about people interacting with each other, so a novel called First Impressions puts the idea of people meeting and interacting with other people front and center. The focus is on manners, behavior, and outward appearance. First impressions matter. Not just because some one else told you they do, but because they just do.  Think back on the last person you met.  Truly.  Think about it. What was this person wearing? What was the first word this person said to you? How did the person leave the room/area/vicinity? Chances are you can answer at least one of the questions above.  Even if you didn't actively try to remember those minute details, you still did.  This is because it is human nature to pay attention to first impressions, even if we have no intention of actively doing so. Here

How might you react if another person completely misinterpreted your actions or intentions?

That is the entire premise of the novel Pride and Prejudice. The novel is centered around two main characters - Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy. Essentially, it all boils down to these characters being attracted to another, but every step along the way they misunderstand eachother.  He thinks she is beneath him.  She thinks that he thinks he is too good for her. Ultimately, they both work through their differences and at the end of the novel they are able to reconcile their differences. 

Is Mr. Darcy related to anyone else in Pride and Prejudice?

Mr. Darcy has one sister (Georgiana), an aunt (Lady Catherine de Bough), a male cousin (Colonel Fitzwilliam), a female cousin (Anne de Bough), and a mother (Anne) mentioned by name in the novel Pride and Prejudice. He has a father who is like a father to George Wickham whose relationship is described as(in reference to the relationship between the later Mr. Darcy and young George Wickham): My father supported him at  school, and afterwards at Cambridge--most important assistance, as his  own father, always poor from the extravagance of his wife, would have been unable to give him a gentleman's education. My father was not only fond of this young man's society, whose manners were always engaging; he had also the highest opinion of him, and hoping the church would be his profession, intended to provide for him in it.

When does Mr. Wickham meet Elizabeth in Pride and Prejudice?

They meet in Chapter 16 in Meryton. But the attention of every lady was soon caught by a young man, whom they had never seen before, of most gentlemanlike appearance, walking with another officer on the other side of the way. The officer was the very Mr. Denny concerning whose return from London Lydia came to inquire, and he bowed as they passed. All were struck with the stranger's air, all wondered who he could be; and Kitty and Lydia, determined if possible to find out, led the way across the street, under pretense of wanting something in an opposite shop, and fortunately had just gained the pavement when the two gentlemen, turning back, had reached the same spot. Mr. Denny addressed them directly, and entreated permission to introduce his friend, Mr. Wickham, who had returned with him the day before from town, and he was happy to say had accepted a commission in their corps. This was exactly as it should be; for the young man wanted only regimentals to make him completely char

Is Mr. Darcy Mr. Bennet's favorite son-in-law?

No. Sarcastic answer: His favorite son-in-law is Mr. Wickham. Actual answer: it is probably a bit of a tie between Mr. Bingley and Mr. Darcy (assuming Kitty and Mary either have no husbands or do not marry so well). How can I say this?  Well, lets first go to the text with regards to his sentiments about Mr. Wickham. "I admire all my three sons-in-law highly," said he. "Wickham, perhaps, is my favourite; but I think I shall like _your_   [Elizabeth's]  husband quite as well as Jane's." Now, if you just read the above without ever having read the rest of the novel, you would assume that Mr. Bennet like Mr. Wickham the most.  Natural assumption to make. However, I would like to conjecture this is not the case at all.  Mr. Bennet is notorious through the novel of being ironic, sardonic, satirical, and generally a pretty bad narrator of his own story.  So to read the text above and to understand what he truly means are completely separate. Here&#

Who is Mr Bennet's favorite son in law?

Sarcastic answer: Mr. Wickham. Actual answer: it is probably a bit of a tie between Mr. Bingley and Mr. Darcy (assuming Kitty and Mary either have no husbands or do not marry so well). How can I say this?  Well, lets first go to the text with regards to his sentiments about Mr. Wickham. "I admire all my three sons-in-law highly," said he. "Wickham, perhaps, is my favourite; but I think I shall like _your_  [Elizabeth's] husband quite as well as Jane's." Now, if you just read the above without ever having read the rest of the novel, you would assume that Mr. Bennet like Mr. Wickham the most.  Natural assumption to make. However, I would like to conjecture this is not the case at all.  Mr. Bennet is notorious through the novel of being ironic, sardonic, satirical, and generally a pretty bad narrator of his own story.  So to read the text above and to understand what he truly means are completely separate. Here's where we need to really delve

How does Mr Darcy save Lydia?

Long story short: Mr. Darcy essentially forces Mr. Wickham to marry Lydia after he tracks them both down in London. Mr. Darcy understood Mr. Wickham's character and knew that Wickham was only after Lydia as a quick conquest. After finding the pair in London he met with Mr. Gardiner (Lydia's uncle) to discuss the circumstances that brought Darcy and Wickham together.  After ensuring he personally took care of the final details, all that was left was to guarantee Lydia was saved from disgrace by Wickham leaving without marrying her, Darcy attended their wedding.  He was there to ensure Wickham showed up and held up his end of the wedding.  This may be one of the earliest examples of a shotgun wedding, although in this case it is Mr. Darcy who is holding the shotgun rather than an enraged father. Short story long: it is probably best to read the text for yourself to get a full understanding of Mr. Darcy's involvement with the marriage between Lydia Bennet and Mr. Wickham.  T

Description of Mrs. Jenkinson in Pride and Prejudice

Mrs. Jenkinson Mrs. Jenkinson is Miss Anne de Bough's companion and is featured in and around Rosings Park in the novel Pride and Prejudice.  No reference is made to Mr. Jenkinson, but we do know that Mrs. Jenkinson had a brother or a sister because Lady Catherine makes reference to Mrs. Jenkinson's four nieces. Physical Appearance There is no  real  physical description in Pride and Prejudice for Mrs. Jenkinson.   Maria Lucas does refer to Mrs. Jenkinson as "the old Lady" when she first sees her in front of The Collins' parsonage with Miss de Bough, however, she is an unreliable witness as she is one of the youngest characters in the book and probably would have called anyone old. After being observed by Elizabeth Bennet at Rosings Park, the only comment made as to what Mrs. Jenkinson looked like was " in whose appearance there was nothing remarkable ".   Character Description and Analysis I might take a different view on Mrs. Jenkinson's cha